Some valuable comments on Piobaireachd/ピーブロック名言集
Piobaireachd is the ultimate challenge;
it challenges one's technique to the ultimate.
It challenges one's sense of musical perception to the ultimate and
it challenges the instrument to the ultimate.
(from "The Concise History of the Bagpipe | Piobaireachd" by Frank J. Timoney)
This is the tune of the Pipes. This is what the instrument was made for.
(from "Tutor for Piobaireach" by Seumas MacNeill)
It actually takes this music to bring out the harmonics and tone of the bagpipe.
(from "The Concise History of the Bagpipe | Piobaireachd" by Frank J. Timoney)
The great Highland pipe comes fully into its own only when playing the music. The same in reverse - the music needs the pipe.
(from "General Principles of Piobaireachd" by Andrew Wright)
Piobaireachd is the term applied to a species of music composed solely for and played solely on the Highland pipe. It cannot be satisfactorily reproduced on any other instrument.
(from liner notes of "Piobaireachd -The Classical Music of the Great Highland Bagpipe" Lismor Recordings)
The great Highland bagpipe and piobaireachd are almost inseparable. The instrument was developed to its present form for the sole purpose of playing this music; and ceel mor was invented for the Highland bagpipe, and cannot be adequately performed on any other instrument, or group of instruments.
(from "Tutor for Piobaireach" by Seumas MacNeill)
"Piobaireachd" simply translating as "piping". 
The word "piobaireachd" indicated that the instrument was inextricably bound up with the music itself.  There's was a symbiotic relationship, the one could not exist without the other.
(from "Piping Press Blog" June 28, 2017 "Piobaireachd can touch the heart of every piper" by Robert Wallace)
Piobaireachd is an art which stands in a very high postition. It influences the thoughts, and has a power over the emotions of the Highland heart that no other type of music can equal.
(from "Piobaireachd Its Origin and Construction" by John Grant/1915)
It is a melodic art, which is unmeasured and innovative.
(from "The Concise History of the Bagpipe | Piobaireachd" by Frank J. Timoney)
The first piobaireachd I heard made me feel weitghtless, so utterly beautiful and fascinating it was. I knew it was the only pipe music I wanted to play. I find piobaireachd to be of great depth and beauty; I love every note and every second of it; only in piobaireachd do the very notes sing.
(a young American's words from "Tutor for Piobaireachd" by Seumas MacNeilll)

I loved Piobaireachd the very moment I heard it, and personally found it to be the most captivating and beautiful of pipe music for which the pipes were made !
(words by Earl from Bob Dunsire's Piobaireachd forum)

Up until a hundred and fifty years ago, almost all bagpipe music was ceol mor (piobaireachd), and so the two terms meant the same thing. Piobairaechd is music which has been composed deliberately and solely for the Highlnad Bagpipe.
(from "Piobaireachd - Classical Music of the Highland Bagpipe" by Seumas MacNeilll)

The word "piobaireachd" means, quite literally, pipe music, or to play the bagpipe. For the last 150 or so years, it has been a word that designates a particular - rather peculiar and exceptionally unique - form of music that has developed only in the Scottish Highlands. It does not appear on any other instrument in any other country.
(words by Chairman Mao from Bob Dunsire's Piobaireachd forum)
The great pipers of old considered the ceol mor to be the only music worthy of thire attention.
(words by A.L.Lloyd from liner notes of John Burgess "King of Highland Pipers" / Topic Records 1969)
I have never seen, heard of, or read of a piper at the top of the tree of his profession who has not treated Ceol Mor ( piobaireachd ) as the highest expression of Highland bagpipe music.
(from "The Kilberry Book of Ceol Mor" by Archibald Campbell)
Piobaireachd is distinguished from the March, Strathspey, and Reel by being termed the "Great Music". The MacCrimmons would never permit their pupils to play such primitive music as "Ceol Antrom" within their hearing.
(from "Piobaireachd Its Origin and Construction" by John Grant/1915)

When I first learned to play pipes there was a clear line between those of us who were "just Pipers" and those who were the "Piobaireachd Players".
(from "How to Piobaireahd Manual and CD" by Archie Cairns )

If you understand the bagpipe in the right way, you will understand piobaireachd.
(words by Archibald Campbell, Kilberry in a lecture on the 5th December 1952 to menbers of the Scottish Piping Society of London. / Text from "Piping Times" August 1995)

The piobaireachd is the big music of the pipes that most solo pipers will aspire too.
The people that don't play piobaireachd tend to not like piobaireachd, because they don't understand it. I think you have got to play it to understand it.
It is the classical music of the pipes that was the original music of the pipes.
(words by Ann Spalding in "Noting the Tradition" project interview, introduced by James Beaton at Piobaireachd Society Conference 2014)

Without piobaireachd, there's NO way a piper can possibly understand the music of the Gael.
(words by Iain Sherwood from Bob Dunsire's Piobaireachd forum)

The piper playing his piobaireachd is almost the only survivor of the musical culture of the Gael as it was in its prime.
(words by Neil Ross from a paper of the Gaelic Society of Inverness in1925, introduced by Finlay MacNeill at Piobaireachd Society Conference 1973)
It may be the only survivor of the musical culture of the Gael as it was in its prime.
(from "The Concise History of the Bagpipe | Piobaireachd" by Frank J. Timoney)
This structure is amazingly akin to Celtic artwork, a simple framework filled with the most complex and minute detail.
(from "The Concise History of the Bagpipe | Piobaireachd" by Frank J. Timoney)
Piobaireachd is indigenous to the Highlands and Gaelic culture. It is one of the few remaining folk music forms that has never been 'popularised' by contemporary musicians. It will take someone of no small musical talent to adapt centuries-old melody lines to modern modes.
(words by Iain Sherwood from Bob Dunsire's Piobaireachd forum)
The piobaireachd is a product, not of barbarism, but of civilisation.
(words by Archibald Campbell, Kilberry in a lecture on the 5th December 1952 to menbers of the Scottish Piping Society of London / Text from the "PIPING TIMES" in August 1995)
Playing a piobaireachd can be likened to a journey.
(from "General Principles of Piobaireachd" by Andrew Wright)
This is our "soul music".
(from "How to Piobaireahd Manual and CD" by Archie Cairns )
In the vernacular, piobaireachd is Highland 'Soul Music,' as it truly expresses the heart of the Gael of the sixteenth to eighteenth centuries.
(words by Iain Sherwood from Bob Dunsire's Piobaireachd forum)
I've discovered that the many of those who meditate, Buddhists, and other contemplative types really like it. Piobaireachd is very Zen...and Taoist
(words by Iain Sherwood from Bob Dunsire's Piobaireachd forum)
I'm pretty new to this whole world of piping, but I've liked piobaireachd from the start. I find it kind of hypnotic and soothing. It's great yoga music.
(words by Moon Mouse from Bob Dunsire's Piobaireachd forum)
I wonder whether one's mind, when playing a piobaireachd, is rather near a yogi's mind, for when one has got a sufficient ease and when one plays quietly without any spirit of competition one enters a different world of music.
(words by Jean Marie Ponsoda from an article on the "PIPING TIMES" in August1995)
This music, and I suspect all great 'classical' music, from western symphonic to the music of the sarod or the music of the Noh Drama express these deep emotional states.
(words by Ron Teague from Bob Dunsire's Piobaireachd forum)
Pibroch is classical music rather than folk music, but it belongs to a current quite separate from the mainstream of European fine art music. In many respects it rather resembles the raga and magam compositions of the Indian and Arabic world - not that there's any direct connection.
(words by A.L.Lloyd from liner notes of John Burgess "King of Highland Pipers" / Topic Records 1969)
One of my British friends and tutor, a top player himself, established a relationship and comparison between Ceol Mor and the traditional Indian music, named Ragas. In the Indian Sanskrit language the breath is named "Prana" and among people who act yoga Prana is the most important way to bring energy and spirit into the body. So we can say that we put life and sprit into an instrument first by the breath until it takes beautiful forms through the fingers.
(words by Jean Marie Ponsoda from an article on the "PIPING TIMES" in August1995)
It's the connection with the days of yore. Ceol Mor was written to commemorate battles lost and won. Great losses of love and life and many other events that shaped our homeland. It always makes me feel at home wherever I am.
(words by Ross McMahon from Bob Dunsire's Piobaireachd forum)
It was supposed to be a musical poem telling of the beauty of hill and dale, of gentle love, joys, wars, of battles, victory, defeat, and sorrow. The Highlander to whome the airs are familiar is naturally stirred by the music of the pibroch.
(from "A School in South Uist" by Frederick Rea)
A symphonic poem, the music is actually constructed as prose and is the telling of a story by phrases.
(from "The Concise History of the Bagpipe | Piobaireachd" by Frank J. Timoney)
It is one of the most elaborately artificial forms of music known to the modern world.
(from "The Concise History of the Bagpipe | Piobaireachd" by Frank J. Timoney)
The authentic voice of the carrying ceol mor stream – music handed down over the generations and available now to calm us all in this mad, frantic, cyberstruck world.
(from "Piping Press Blog" June 28, 2017 "Piobaireachd can touch the heart of every piper" by Robert Wallace)
I think the deepness of meaning and culture are a huge part of Piobaireachd. Some people only examine things technically and lots of people don't like anything without a beat. But "if you feel it, you know it"..as Rita Marley sang..and Piobaireachd can make you feel it.
(words by Kitfox from Bob Dunsire's Piobaireachd forum)
Sometimes a slowness of finger could actually assist the delivery of pleasing ceol mor.
Rather than being clipped to extinction, with slower, softer hands movements were allowed to breathe and their true embellishing beauty thus came forth.  So here was encouragement for all the adult learners on the course.
(from "Piping Press Blog" June 28, 2017 "Piobaireachd can touch the heart of every piper" by Robert Wallace)
It is interesting because piobaireachd expresses something of the life of the people in earlier times in Scotland ; the strong Scottish temper, and the history of Scotland through the laments, salutes and gatherings and the stories that accompany them. People can learn a lot about early Scottish life through this expressive music.
(words by Anne Lore from an article on the "PIPING TODAY" No.20 2006)
It is music of great depth, and one can study or ponder over a piobaireachd for a lifetime, and still progress in one's understanding of the music and find new depths in it.
(from "The Art of PIOBAIREACH" by Ian L McKay)
It is the oldest form of pipe music still extant and requires a lifetime dedication demanding analysis and deep study.  One can study a Piobaireachd for a lifetime and yet find new depth in it.
(from "The Concise History of the Bagpipe | Piobaireachd" by Frank J. Timoney)
When I play piobaireachd, I imagine I am not here... I need to have a very large and nice view to make me feel like I am in a dream. And my fingers can fly over my chanter... it is heaven on earth. It is like being bewitched. Now, I think, I am dependent on piobaireachd.
(words by Anne Lore from an article on the "PIPING TODAY" No.20 2006)
It has been described as Scotlnad's major contribution to world culture, and one piece, "Lament for the Children", has been hailed as the finest single-line melody in Europian music.
(from "Piobaireachd - Classical Music of the Highland Bagpipe" by Seumas MacNeilll)
I rejected a career as an orchestral flute player because the pibroch repertoire is musically richer than that for flute, and the prospects for improvisation and new music just as exciting.
(words by Barnaby Brown from Bob Dunsire's Piobaireachd forum)
It has greater freedom than the requirements of modern instrumental music.
(from "The Concise History of the Bagpipe | Piobaireachd" by Frank J. Timoney)
The principal difference between ceol mor and other types of classical music is that it is purely melodic and has great freedom in time and pitch.
(from "The Concise History of the Bagpipe | Piobaireachd" by Frank J. Timoney)
I love pibroch because there's more responsibility on the performer interpreting the score and it's the distilled genius of the Highlands' greatest musicians over 200 years, packed with moments as profoundly moving as anything in the transnational traditions for choir, symphony orchestra or keyboard.
(words by Barnaby Brown from Bob Dunsire's Piobaireachd forum)
Piobaireachd sings to me somehow. It's the primary reason I wanted to play the instrument. The more I learn of it, the more I hear it, the more I love it.
(words by Ayrhead from Bob Dunsire's Piobaireachd forum)
Its interpretation depends on one's mood or even age, a sophisticated contrived mosaic, with a very personal story.
(from "The Concise History of the Bagpipe | Piobaireachd" by Frank J. Timoney)
Playing good light music is the art of making the chanter sing.
Playing good piobaireachd is the art of making the chanter talk.
(words by Chris Eyre from Bob Dunsire's Piobaireachd forum)
 He/she had to play (ceol mor) from head to heart to fingers NOT head to feet to fingers as the ceol beag player was bound to do.
(from "Piping Press Blog" June 28, 2017 "Piobaireachd can touch the heart of every piper" by Robert Wallace)
This music is about the player telling a story. I think one must be a player to understand the story being told. Its always better to play than it is to listen. To analyze the music by hearing, is to have a bad vantage point. It can only be really understood by playing it yourself. The voice can only really be heard by having the drones humming on your shoulder and the chanter alive in your hands. The player is the one who understands the story being told.
(words by David Gallagher from Bob Dunsire's Piobaireachd forum)
Piobaireachd is more like a conversation than music. Thats how I see it. You are storytelling, you are relating something to the audience that is deeper than sound. Each variation is like a wave washing over the listener. So in something like Mary McLeod you hear love, respect and longing. You hear the sad undertones and the overtures of friendship.
(words by Desert Piper from Bob Dunsire's Piobaireachd forum)
One aspect of the piobaireachd that appeals to me is the way it allows you to REALLY hear the tuning of the pipe, what's going on with the harmonics between the drones and chanter, etc. You can hear the subtleties of the individual notes against the drones in a way that is hard to appreciate in the light music.
I think you need to study piob a bit before you can begin to really appreciate it; the way the tunes are structured, what's going on with the pulsing/phrasing, how the shades of light and dark are achieved in the music. It's that understanding of how all these elements are put together that enables the accomplished piob player to bring the tune to life rather than have it sound as just some kind of tuning exercise.
(words by Ed Via from Bob Dunsire's Piobaireachd forum)
It is certainly difficult music to understand but in a well played piobaireachd on a well tuned pipe, sounds can be produced which are never heard in marches, strathspeys or reels and which satisfy the ear of a skilled piping musician in a way that no other sounds can do.
(Words by Archibald Campbell, Kilberry from a lecture on the 5th December 1952 to menbers of the Scottish Piping Society of London. / Text from the "PIPING TIMES" in August 1995)
For me it ain't about the audience or about the judges, I rarely play for others and never compete, it is always about that place in the human soul where the composers of this music discovered this great music.
(words by Ron Teague from Bob Dunsire's Piobaireachd forum)
I've always thought music was an art and not a sports, so I have never involved myself in competition and hard training. More important for me is the time spent in thinking, singing, wondering... to know and reach the deep heart of piobaireachd.
(words by Eric Freyssinet from an article on the "PIPING TODAY" No.29 2007)
I read or heard a report given by a World Champion Pipe Major that he felt Piobaireachd was a 'selfish' form of music, in that only the player is actually enjoying the tune.
(words by Roger Huth from Bob Dunsire's Piobaireachd forum)
Piobaireachd is one of those forms which is more often appreciated by the performer (or other players) than by the casual listener, although people who are into meditation and/or Eastern philosophy find it interesting.
(words by Iain Sherwood from Bob Dunsire's Piobaireachd forum)
Piobaireachd needs an ability to fly off the earth - spirituality and depth - and if you cannot set aside other things, like busy lives and work, you cannot withdraw into your mind and think only and wholly of your music. But some people can do that.
(words by Anne Lore from an article on the "PIPING TODAY" No.20 2006)
For years I considered the piobaireachd as being much too complicated and something of a mystery. But I knew that it was the true music of the pipes. It touched something in me. Sometimes it would make me weep. Not in sadness, but in awe. I felt as if I was listening to God's music, perhaps the sound of history itself.
(words by Gr8_Piper from Bob Dunsire's Piobaireachd forum)
PIobaireachd is easier to play than marches, strathspeys and reels.
(from "Tutor for Piobaireach" by Seumas MacNeill)
The finger dexterity required for one(=piobaireachd) was half that for the other(=MSR).
Learn a crunluath and the top hand movements well and you were ready to go at least in the fingerwork department.
(from "Piping Press Blog" June 28, 2017 "Piobaireachd can touch the heart of every piper" by Robert Wallace)
Piobaireachd technique is much easier than M/S/Rs, though that is not to say it's easy. However, the music of piobaireachd is very, very difficult. That is to say, it's a lot easier to maintain the listener's interest with light music than with piobaireachd.
(words by Jim McGillivray from Bob Dunsire's Piobaireachd forum)
This was simple music which only required an understanding of the medium on which it was performed, its tonal shifts, its rhythms and its structure, to be appreciated.
(from "Piping Press Blog" June 28, 2017 "Piobaireachd can touch the heart of every piper" by Robert Wallace)
My extremely simplified layman's view of piobaireachd is that it's an elaborately developed excuse to play sustained notes on the most beautiful sounding instrument. Sustained notes on the pipes have a lovely churning or shifting harmonic layer that is not apparent in light music. Like moths to a flame, we just want to get closer to The Big Drone. If you love the sound the instrument makes then you have enough to be able to listen to piobaireachd.
(words by Doug Campbell from Bob Dunsire's Piobaireachd forum)
I would say that when the MacCrimmons added the third drone, it was to enhance the sound for their piobaireachd compositions. Therefore the bagpipes we play today were indeed made for piob, and not vice versa.
(words by Roger Huth from Bob Dunsire's Piobaireachd forum)
The master pipers of the old days used to have a boy attendant or gillie whose duty it was to carry the pipes for him. When the player came to the end of a piobaireachd, he used to throw the pieps disdainfully away from him - generally over his sholder - as showing that the music lay in the soul and fingers of the piper rather than in the instrument. It was the boy's duty to catch the pipes and to lay them by with more care than his master showed, at least in public !
(from "The Bagpipe Fiddle and Harp" by Francis Collinson)
Ceol mor has as much artistry as any classical art form. Artistry breathes life into this lovely ancient art form. More than any other music for the piob mor, artistry is key for the performance of ceol mor. It is called ceol mor because it is indeed the BIG MUSIC for the pipe.
(words by Ron Teague from Bob Dunsire's Piobaireachd forum)
A piobaireachd may require you to have a perfect bagpipe for twenty minutes or so, so instrument maintenance and control are for more exacting.
(words by John Bottomley from Bob Dunsire's Piobaireachd forum)
Learning ceol mor takes a lot of time to get the basic flavor of the music. Once the basic idiom is mastered, more or less, then artistic expression takes over and one is playing music not just tunes. It is sort of like method acting where ones past emotional experiences are brought to the performance to give it authenticity. the more serious emotional experiences the piper has the better his music will be.
(words by Ron Teague from Bob Dunsire's Piobaireachd forum)
It took years of study and application – and an ability to wind, control and set the bagpipe – before it could be delivered satisfactorily to the tutored ear.
(from "Piping Press Blog" June 28, 2017 "Piobaireachd can touch the heart of every piper" by Robert Wallace)
It has been said that piobaireachd is learned as a youth to be mastered in ones age.
(words by Ron Teague from Bob Dunsire's Piobaireachd forum)
For me the purpose of learning ceol mor is to get it into my bones, so I can sing it in my sleep. For me it ain't about the audience or about the judges, I rarely play for others and never compete, it is always about that place in the human soul where the composers of this music discovered this great music.
(words by Ron Teague from Bob Dunsire's Piobaireachd forum)
There is interest in piping in many parts of Japan, and piobaireachd seems to apeal to the Japanese mind. One day at the Games in Dornoch, a Japanese lady paused to listen at the piobaireachd platform, never having encountered the music before. She was held by it, and seventeen piobaireachd performances later was begging to be told where she could hear more. Many Japanese people have an instinct for patterns, and this lady was able to discern those of the structure in each tune, on first hearing.
(from "Piping Traditions of the Outer Isles" by Bridget MacKenzie
I've discovered, relatively late on, that playing piobaireachd in public can be a much greater success than you might imagine it to be. Even to us, piobaireachd is a slightly esoteric art, which you learn to appreciate, but if it is delivered smoothly and well in tune people may not know what is coming next but will often sense what is going on there is not quite the normal thing.
(words by Roderick Cannon at Piobaireachd Society Conference 2014)
My four-year old grandson will sit and listen to a six hour videotape of a piobaireachd competition. I noticed that during one tune he was fooling around more with a toy car than paying attention, so I asked him if he was finished watching the video. He told me no, he just didn't like this tune as much as some of the others.
(words by Lyle Walker from Bob Dunsire's Piobaireachd forum)
Above comments are quoted from books and tutors etc.…, and many from Bob Dunsire's Piobaireachd forum with late Bob's permission. Every quotation from the forum have link to the specific thread.
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